Pottery diagram

I’ll let you into a secret – I’m not really posting this because I’m thinking that anyone has much interest in pottery, but because I’m testing my technology for mobile diagram-blogging from overseas. This drawing took one hour from starting to being on the blog, which was a little challenge I set myself. Don’t look…

Pottery diagram

I’ll let you into a secret – I’m not really posting this because I’m thinking that anyone has much interest in pottery, but because I’m testing my technology for mobile diagram-blogging from overseas. This drawing took one hour from starting to being on the blog, which was a little challenge I set myself. Don’t look for jokes because there aren’t any.

Unfortunately I’m finding my technology is struggling rather, but I really don’t want to have to buy a new computer for this trip. [Dull technological details] I’m trying to run Windows XP on a netbook with only one G of memory, whereas at home I’d have 4 Gs. Everything is sluggish, and I can’t make my image program open image files (possibly lack of memory). I will keep on trying to resolve the complications, but it is, as usual, frustrating that technological concerns take far more of my energy than creative ones.

Pottery update: I’m making two vases and a teapot. Stage 8 is in progress as we speak. There are more stages after 10 really, but I ran out of space.

7 Comments

  1. Dave, how confident are you of connections etc. in Ogongora? I’ve had a lot of problems with up-country conections away from major towns in Uganda.
    I think you may be risking it with just 1G of memory, too.
    I’m not so up on images etc. but document uploading (rather than real-time text/blog connections) can be a real pain with low speed/band-width combined with inflexible memory.

    1. Simon – We are staying somewhere that should have internet, but I’m assuming it will be hard to upload anything large. But in terms of file size my diagrams are better than most things. Yes, 1Gb isn’t great. I am going to experiment today with a few changes, including more frequent restarting (I do tend to just log off / sleep) and see whether that improves it.

      David – Thank you. Afraid I’m not really knowledgeable about Linux and don’t have a lot of time to learn until we go. Also my image editing programme only works in Windows I think.

  2. You may find yourself better off with Linux on a laptop that low-spec, it may free up more of the memory for image editing tasks.

  3. Please check any software that you do not need to clutter up adn use memory adn kick it for the time in Uganda. XP tends to use a lot memory for tasks you are not interested in adn do not need running.. kick it or shut it down and a lot more mem is there to really use…
    Would you get any chanc to inform yourself (and us) on the situation of gays adn lesbians in Uganda?
    Grada

  4. Dave,

    Further in support of linux; the de-facto image editing program on linux is the GIMP (http://www.gimp.org/), which you can also get for Windows (all free). So try that on Windows and see if you like it. It might even prove to be more usable than your current setup without switching entirely to linux. Alternatively inkscape (also available cross-platform), which you could use to trace your originals and generate cartoons at whatever resolution you prefer.

    Phil

    1. Phil – thanks for this. I use Gimp sometimes. But doesn’t match my beloved Microsoft Image Composer in terms of the things I need (draggable image size, drag sprites in and out of workspace)

Comments are closed.